On July 28, 2017, the Tax Court denied the April 14, 2016 Joint Motion to Remand the case to the IRS Whistleblower Office.  In the joint motion, the parties represented that the IRS Whistleblower Office had reconsidered its determination.  The Tax Court previously issued an order for the parties to file a status report by

The United States Tax Court held in Smith v. Commissioner of Internal Revenue that the threshold limitation found in section 7623(b)(5) have “clear meaning” and were intended to limit the nondiscretionary award regime to larger cases.  The Court explained:

Subsection (b)(5) is intended to make the nondiscretionary award program of subsection (b)(1) and (2) applicable

Today the Tax Court issued an opinion, Whistleblower 4496-15W v. Commissioner of Internal Revenue, granting the IRS’s motion for summary judgement.  In this case, the informant had received a preliminary award determination for an award of $2,954,933.  Congratulation to the informant in this case on the receipt of an award.  The award was computed

The ability to remain anonymous throughout the administrative and judicial whistleblower award determination an appeal processes has been a common theme in the concerns that we hear from clients and something that I spoke about on a panel at the ABA Section of Taxation Meeting in May of 2016.  This includes how to protect

The Tax Court’s September 16th opinion echoes what every whistleblower litigating in Tax Court knows; the IRS’s Whistleblower Administrative File is insufficient.  The petitioners in this case moved to compel production of documents and responses to interrogatories that were requesting information at the would show whether the IRS used their information to collect tax,

The Tax Court released Whistleblower 21276-13W v. Commissioner of Internal Revenue, 144 T.C. No. 15 today.  While this decision is positive news for some whistleblowers, it is also a reminder of the importance of following best practices when filing a whistleblower case.

The facts of this case are interesting and a read of the full

The United States Tax Court released an opinion today, Whistleblower 22231-12W v. Commissioner of Internal Revenue, which continues to piece together the bounds of the Tax Court’s jurisdiction.  The Tax Court held that the IRS Whistleblower Office could not have made a determination under section 7623(b)(1) until it has completed its review of all

The Tax Court held that it has jurisdiction to review the IRS’s whistleblower claims award determinations where the informant has alleged that they provided significant information to the IRS before and after December 20, 2006, the effective date of section 7623(b).  Whistleblower 11332-13W v. Commissioner, 142 T.C. No. 21, is a continuation of one

Judge Kroupa of the U.S. Tax Court issued three memorandum opinions on Tuesday concerning whether or not the whistleblowers in those cases could proceed anonymously under Rule 345(a).  All three memorandum opinions, T.C. Memo 2014-92, T.C. Memo 2014-93, and T.C. Memo 2014-94 were in favor of the whistleblower’s motion to proceed anonymously.

There seems to be a trend of interpreting SOX in a way that extends the whistleblower protections to a widening circle of persons. Most recently, a judge in Eastern District of Pennsylvania had allowed a retaliation lawsuit under SOX against non-publicly traded subsidiary of a publicly traded corporation to proceed after examining the agency relationship