Whistleblower 21276-13W v. CIR

On July 28, 2017, the Tax Court denied the April 14, 2016 Joint Motion to Remand the case to the IRS Whistleblower Office.  In the joint motion, the parties represented that the IRS Whistleblower Office had reconsidered its determination.  The Tax Court previously issued an order for the parties to file a status report by October 19, 2016, to report the efforts to resolve the case and held the joint motion in abeyance.  A similar order was issued on October 25, 2016, for the parties to file a status report on or before April 25, 2017.  On April 11, 2017, respondent filed a status report indicating that the IRS Whistleblower Office is prepared to make a revised determination regarding petitioner’s claim and asked the Court to grant the Motion to Remand.  On April 20, 2017, petitioner advised the Court that he believes that remand is unnecessary and would needlessly delay the case. 

The Court walks through an interesting discussion about when remand would be appropriate.  Ultimately, the Court follows what it has previously done in cases where the IRS reopens a claim or reexamines its determination, stating:

We see no reason why remand is required to enable to Office to issue a new final determination letter.  Alternatively, if the parties have resolved all issues in this case to their mutual satisfaction, they may employ this Court’s standard procedures for bringing this case to an end.  This order does not foreclose the possibility of remand, should we determine that we may properly order one, in a future whistleblower case where a remand would serve a useful purpose.

This resolution follows Whistleblower 21276-13W v. Commissioner of Internal Revenue, wherein the Court retained jurisdiction of the claim and required the parties to file status reports while the parties to resolve the case and allow the IRS Whistleblower Office to review, investigate, and evaluate the merits of those whistleblowers’ claim. 

We believe that allowing the parties to work to resolve the case this way is similar to allowing taxpayers, who have not already gone to Appeals, to go to Appeals after filing a petition with the Tax Court.  Ultimately, this allows the parties to find a resolution while preventing whistleblower cases from being unnecessarily delayed.  

The Tax Court’s opinion in Whistleblower 21276-13W v. Commissioner, 147 T.C. No. 4 (2016), was a clear and decisive win for whistleblowers.  The IRS has long been improperly trying to limit what should be included in “collected proceeds” and today’s opinion restores Congress’s intention that all proceeds that are collected be included in the amount on which the whistleblower’s award is computed.  By specifically including criminal fines and forfeitures in the collected proceeds amount, this court decision means that a whistleblowers’ award will reflect the full amount that the government collected based on their information.  In this opinion, the Tax Court examined the definition of “collected proceeds” as used in section 7623(b)(1).  The court found that the language of that

Section 7623(b)(1) is straightforward and written in expansive terms, namely, where, using information provided by the whistleblower, the Secretary proceeds with an administrative or judicial action regarding underpayments of tax or any action regarding the violation or, or conniving to violate, the internal revenue laws, the whistleblower is entitled to an award based on a percentage of the collected proceeds resulting from the Secretary’s action (as well as any related actions) or from any settlement in response to such action.

The court refused to follow Respondent’s request to narrow the definition of collected proceeds.  The court stated:

We are leery of arbitrarily limiting the meaning of an expansive and general term such as “collected proceeds”. In drafting section 7623(b)(1), Congress could have provided that the whistleblower’s award is to based on taxes and other amounts assessed and collected by the IRS under title 26. But it did not.

The court explained that this case is not in conflict with Whistleblower 22716-13W v. Commissioner, which had ruled that FBAR penalties were not to be included in the $2 million threshold amount used to determine if section 7623(b) applied.  The court here stated that:

In reaching our holding today, we determined that the wording in the threshold requirement of section 7623(b)(5)(B) … is different from that of section 7623(b)(1), which provides for an award of a percentage of the collected proceeds …

The Tax Court held that the phrase “collected proceeds” is sweeping in scope and is not limited to amounts assessed and collected under Title 26 of the United States Code.  The Tax Court goes on to hold that criminal fines under Title 18 as well as civil forfeitures under Title 31 are both collected proceeds under section 7623(b)(1).